Young Men Are Playing Video Games Instead of Getting Jobs

Peter1

Video games, like work, are basically a series of quests comprised of mundane and repetitive tasks: Receive an assignment, travel to a location, overcome some obstacles, perform some sort of search, pick up an item, and then deliver it in exchange for a reward—and, usually, another quest, which starts the cycle all over again. You are not playing the game so much as following its orders. The game is your boss; to succeed, you have to do what it says.

This is especially true in the genre that has come to dominate much of big-budget game development, the open-world action role-playing game, which blends the hair-trigger violence of traditional shooters with the massive explorable landscapes of games like Grand Theft Auto and the intricate craft and character leveling systems of pen-and-paper tabletop fantasy games like Dungeons & Dragons… More at reason.com.

And why wouldn’t you?

2 thoughts on “Young Men Are Playing Video Games Instead of Getting Jobs

  1. Yeah. And the way games now basically guarantee progress… if a player gets stuck, that’s considered more the fault of the gamemaker than of the player, which is more than you can say about life.

  2. Funny. I just finished Mass Effect Andromeda. I enjoyed it and certainly didn’t think of it as work. Of course one of the things on my waiting for retirement list was to catch up on video games, RPGs to be specific. That said, I had a hard time finishing many of the others.

    So if video games are like work, does that mean I’m really working, just at a different type of job?

    But couldn’t one say that about just about anything that you don’t totally initiate and control yourself? How many things around the house do you initiate yourself. I mean without it needing to be done. And once you’ve started, do you go your own way or is there a pretty set path you have to take. Maybe it’s not another person telling you what to do, but if you deviate from the path, you won’t get the desired results.

    If you enjoy pure experimentation, then is that work? If you initiate the experiment and you don’t care what the results are because anything is learning, then that isn’t a job, is it?

    So am I really retired or just working at different things?

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