Apple sort of fixes the battery issue

To address our customers’ concerns, to recognize their loyalty and to regain the trust of anyone who may have doubted Apple’s intentions, we’ve decided to take the following steps:

Apple is reducing the price of an out-of-warranty iPhone battery replacement by $50 — from $79 to $29 — for anyone with an iPhone 6 or later whose battery needs to be replaced, starting in late January and available worldwide through December 2018.

Details will be provided soon on apple.com.

Early in 2018, we will issue an iOS software update with new features that give users more visibility into the health of their iPhone’s battery, so they can see for themselves if its condition is affecting performance.

As always, our team is working on ways to make the user experience even better, including improving how we manage performance and avoid unexpected shutdowns as batteries age.

Do you think this is an adequate response? I wrote about why I didn’t think the problem was as big as people have made out before and must say that in my experience the first thing to go on any iPhone that has been heavily used is the battery. $29 for a new one seems quite good to me.

4 thoughts on “Apple sort of fixes the battery issue

  1. How long do we expect the battery to last in a device which gets such heavy use as a phone? I’d have thought a couple of years before it would be reasonable to see degradation…

  2. Expected battery life was my question as well. I’ve never made what I consider heavy use of my iPhones and since I’m retired, my usage has dropped considerably from that. Based on my checking with coconutBattery, my battery should last a good few years yet.

    While I understand what Apple was doing, throttling back performance to alleviate problems with old batteries, they should have said something up front, like on the support page when people ask about poorer performance. They could have avoided all of this. They also should have provided an option to turn it off, along with a warning that the device could become unstable. I don’t think anyone expects a battery to last forever.

    So is this an adequate mea culpa? In my opinion, yes, but I want to see what they’re adding re battery condition. I still think they should have an option. For example, is it based on true condition, i.e. cycles used, or is it age based? If age based, I’d be ticked because my battery is about 85% of max.

    And the drop in battery replacement is nice, but $79 for an out-of-warranty replacement wasn’t overly expensive to begin with.

  3. Now 15 class-action suits and counting. The apology hans’t slowed down the filings. You’d think they’d have learned. I know that Apple likes to do what they think best even if their customers might disagree, but they’ve had a number of similar situations. The bigger they are, the bigger the target. Especially if they purport to hold themselves to a higher standard.

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