Music

In the beginning (well, my beginning anyway) there were LPs and my parents old 33s. Then cameth cassette tapes and behold the radiant wonder of the CD. Upon this time was a golden age of mixtapes, whereupon one might assemble a cherrypicked selection of tunes (and come on – some may disagree but wouldn’t you say most albums are a few good songs and a bunch of filler?) for thine only pleasure or to pitcheth a bit of woo… (gettest thou to the High Fidelity if you are ill-informed of this most wond’rous art.) More at Kirk’s UI Dev Blog.

Kirk covers a lot of the frustrations of dealing with keeping music in 2019 and I get where he is coming from. It also coincides with a conversation I had with a friend from work, a friend who buys music on CD. Yes, seriously. He buys music on little discs, the like of which people used to buy in the olden days.

It dawned on me that time has moved on to the point that for some of us physical music makes no sense at all. The idea that you should buy music on a physical disc for it to feel real makes sense until you realise this is an illusion. Imagine for instance 400 CDs on shelves- how many of them would get played and even those that do would only come off the shelf very occasionally. They sit there for 99.9% of the time doing nothing apart from taking up space and using the Earths resources to be made in the first place.

Also, my experience with Apple Music is one of discovery to the point that the majority of music I play on a daily basis was unknown to me 2 years ago. Artists like Billie Eilish would have passed me by completely were it not for streaming and I am now more than happy to pay a monthly subscription, presumably for the rest of my life, to have access to all of the music I need. CDs be damned.

Note: the music in the video below is brilliant, the visuals, however, may not suit those of you with a nervous disposition.

One thought on “Music

  1. Glad you found it thought-provoking!

    CDs are still big in Japan, among other places. I mean it’s a good quality medium and durable, and more likely to be durable over decades I think – even though I’m not behold to a streaming service, appropriate backups will always be a discipline.

    Also, it’s interesting to me that you still think in terms of “discovering artists”. For me it’s about discovering songs, and in only a small select amount of cases do I find it worthwhile to pursue the back-catalog. But my tastes are very pop-ish and hook-driven, so I get better mileage keeping my ears open to commercials and soundtracks and random happenstance videos and recommendations – to the extent that I discover about 15-25 songs a month

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