The Apple Store lustre

There was the time he visited the Easton Town Center location to buy a laptop for his 11-year-old daughter and spent almost 20 minutes getting an employee to accept his credit card. In January, Smith was buying a monitor and kept asking store workers to check him out, but they couldn’t because they were Apple “Geniuses” handling tech support and not sales.

“It took me forever to get someone to sell me the product,” says Smith, who runs 2PM Inc., an e-commerce research and consulting firm. “It’s become harder to buy something, even when the place isn’t busy. Buying a product there used to be a revered thing, now you don’t want to bother with the inconvenience.” More here.

I was in an Apple Store at the weekend and the article rings true. There was a time when it felt welcoming and as if the staff would do anything to help. It is still better than almost every other retailer, but there is no doubt a lot of the lustre has gone.

2 thoughts on “The Apple Store lustre

  1. Yeah i wouldn’t be surprised if the whole “town square” idea turns out to be a big, confusing mistake. There’s absolutely a hierarchy implied when you’re looking to buy a new thing vs needing someone who can help w/ your old one, and I think that’s still reflected in the staffing, but no longer reflected in the physical space. i know there’s that idea that the genius bar seemed arrogant and they wanted to get those people out on the floor mingling, but when you’re looking for that kind of help, I think you might even feel better if the person helping you was a bit special, not just a wanderer….

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s