A Year Of Google & Apple Maps

1495823350265.gif

Coincidence or not, it was interesting. And it made me wonder what else would change, if we kept watching. Would Google keep adding detail? And would Apple, like Google, also start making changes?

So I wrote a script that takes monthly screenshots of Google and Apple Maps.1 And thirteen months later, we now have a year’s worth of images… More at Justin O’Beirne.

Some serious dedication has been put into this.

Bear 1.2

feature-themes@2x-800x716.jpg

Popular note-taking app Bear received an update on Thursday across Mac and iOS that adds a number of notable features to the Evernote rival.

The biggest change to Bear is the ability to sketch on iOS. Users can now add sketches to their notes using a finger or stylus. Sketches are drawn on a separate open canvas, which includes pencil and marker tools similar to Apple Notes, with each pencil coming in three sizes and a range of colors… More at MacRumors.

It is a shame that the subscription option gets so much criticism, but I can see why because most people may struggle with the notion of paying for one app that does one thing well.

Cone: A Real World Colour Picker

Screen Shot 2017-05-23 at 19.43.41.png

– Real-time Preview: Cone starts previewing colors in real time as soon as the app is launched
– Pantone Colors: Shows the closest Pantone colors to the captured colors.
– Freeze Frame: Are the colors on move? Instantly freeze the frame and pick colors in your own time
– Copy and Share: Easily copy color codes and use them in Sketch or PS (on macOS 10.12 and iOS 10)
– Color Palette: Creates a beautiful palette for every saved color… Download here.

That is so clever.

NotePlan

device-family.2d4166e30a7841669e1c18998085cef7-780x402.png

NotePlan is dead simple in concept. It opens as a calendar, with a grid showing the current month. Each day-square has a list of that day’s events. So far, it’s just like a regular calendar app. But click on a day and you are taken to the Note view. This is a plain-text sheet with the day’s events listed at the top, above a dividing line. Below that line, you can type anything you like. But if you type things in the right way, then these tasks will be turned into tasks and shown on the calendar. What’s more, just hitting a keyboard shortcut can add any task to your actual calendar, or to your Reminders list… More at Cult of Mac.

I like the look of this.

Why I refuse to delete old apps

https---blueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com-uploads-card-image-470875-3d1af3bc-0413-460e-b023-e880331b3020.jpg

For instance, I use the app Memopad app to mark up screenshots. But I can’t even remember the last time I marked up a screenshot. I’ve probably marked up fewer than five screenshots in the last year. Do I really need this app?

Memopad is just one the many single-purpose apps that I have on my phone. Black is a photo-editing app that’s excellent for creating black-and-white photos. Camcorder is an app that makes your videos look like old low-res VHS recordings. Fasten is a ride-sharing app I downloaded in Austin while at SXSW and don’t need for at least another year. I’ve got Printer Pro for printing out files from my iPhone even though I’ve never printed anything from my iPhone, ever. The list of one-off apps goes on and on.

The simple truth is I don’t need these apps. I know I don’t need them. But fear keeps me from deleting them because when I need them, I won’t have them. Like that stupid printer app or the four “document-to-PDF” scanner apps I’ve got — I’ll be prepared when I do need to print a document, and you’ll be the fool who’s scrambling to find an app to do it… More at Mashable.

I have many old apps still installed on my iPhone, but a lot will be gone when the iOS 11 purge happens.