A Breathtaking Stained-Glass Cabin

1490135793704-gc3.jpeg

A miniature house made from glass shows off expert construction and dazzling motifs seemingly ripped from Alice In Wonderland. Covered with stained glass, the house sits on a stretch of luscious green land in Mohawk, New Jersey. Neile Cooper, a long-time stained-glass artist and jeweler, considers the Glass Cabin her most ambitious work to date. The sharp right angles of the house juxtapose with the swiveling oversized leaves and the curving wingspan of butterflies, accentuating the fantasy house. “The Glass Cabin is my dream project, my creative sanctuary in my yard in a lovely lakeside town,” the artist tells Creators.

That is really smart.

When fictional adverts become real

heinz-ads-mad-men.jpg

Partly a PR stunt, partly just solid on-brand communications, the campaign is sure to delight fans of the AMC show, which in July will celebrate the 10th anniversary of its premiere. And in a nice touch, the ads are officially being credited to Heinz’s current agency, David Miami, and to Don’s fictional 1960s firm, Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. (Draper and Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner, who approved the idea, are both listed in the credits.) More at Kottke.org.

The original Mad Men clip, which inspired the latest Heinz campaign is below-

It would make sense for Bulova to do the same thing with the clip below. Bulova watches have become something of a ‘just another’ watch brand, but the Accutron name still carries a lot of power.

Inside The Hunt For Russia’s Most Notorious Hacker

WI0417_cover_RGB_V-932x1264.png

The case also expanded beyond the virtual world. In New York one day in 2009, three young women from Kazakhstan walked into the FBI field office there with a strange story. The women had come to the States to look for work and found themselves participating in a curious scheme: A man would drive them to a local bank and tell them to go inside and open a new account. They were to explain to the teller that they were students visiting for the summer. A few days later, the man had them return to the bank and withdraw all of the money in the account; they kept a small cut and passed the rest on to him. Agents pieced together that the women were “money mules”: Their job was to cash out the funds that Slavik and his comrades had siphoned from legitimate accounts… More at Wired.

A brilliant article.